Thomas Jackson cytaty

Thomas Jackson Fotografia
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Thomas Jackson

Data urodzenia: 21. Styczeń 1824
Data zgonu: 10. Maj 1863

Reklama

Thomas Jonathan Jackson, pseud. „Stonewall” – konfederacki generał; brał udział w wojnie secesyjnej; prawdopodobnie najbardziej znany dowódca Południa, po generale Robercie E. Lee. Brał udział w kampanii w dolinie Shenandoah jako dowódca korpusu Armii Północnej Wirginii w 1862.

Został postrzelony przypadkowo przez własnych ludzi pod Chancellorsville – przeżył, lecz amputowano mu rękę. Zmarł na zapalenie płuc osiem dni później. Jego śmierć była ciosem dla dowództwa Konfederacji, wpływając nie tylko na efektywność strategiczną, ale i morale zarówno wojsk, jak i ludności cywilnej.

Historycy wojskowi uważają Jacksona za jednego z bardziej uzdolnionych przywódców w historii USA. Jego działania podczas kampanii w dolinie Shenandoah oraz działania prowadzące do zwyciężenia zaskoczonej armii federalnej pod Chancellorsville są studiowane na całym świecie i brane jako przykład innowacyjnego oraz odważnego dowództwa. Jego zasługi nie kończą się jednak na tym epizodzie: I bitwa nad Bull Run , II bitwa nad Bull Run, Antietam czy Fredericksburg. Jackson nie odnosił ciągłych sukcesów jako wódz, co można wywnioskować ze słabej postawy w bitwach siedmiodniowych oraz pod Richmond w 1862 r.

Cytaty Thomas Jackson

„Przekroczmy rzekę i odpocznijmy w cieniu drzew.“

— Thomas Jackson
ostatnie słowa, wypowiedziane na łożu śmierci.

Reklama

„Generale Rodes, czy jest pan gotów?“

— Thomas Jackson
przed rozpoczęciem tzw. manewru Jacksona w bitwie pod Chancellorsville.

„Say as little of yourself and friends as possible.“

— Thomas Jackson
Context: Never engross the whole conversation to yourself. Say as little of yourself and friends as possible.

„If the general government should persist in the measures now threatened, there must be war.“

— Thomas Jackson
Context: If the general government should persist in the measures now threatened, there must be war. It is painful enough to discover with what unconcern they speak of war and threaten it. They do not know its horrors. I have seen enough of it to make me look upon it as the sum of all evils. Comments to his pastor (April 1861) as quoted in [http://books.google.com/books?id=bG2vg5cH004C Memoirs of Stonewall Jackson by His Widow Mary Anna Jackson (1895)], Ch. IX : War Clouds — 1860 - 1861, p. 141; This has sometimes been paraphrased as "War is the sum of all evils." Before Jackson's application of the term "The sum of all evils" to war, it had also been applied to slavery by abolitionist Cassius Marcellus Clay in The Writings of Cassius Marcellus Clay : Including Speeches and Addresses (1848), p. 445; to death by Georg Christian Knapp in Lectures on Christian Theology (1845), p. 404; and it had also been used, apparently in relation to arrogance in a translation of "Homily 24" in The Homilies of S. John Chrysostom on the First Epistle of St. Paul the Apostle to the Corinthians (1839), p. 331 <!-- earliest use thus far found ~ Kalki 2008·01·21 -->

„Always mystify, mislead, and surprise the enemy, if possible; and when you strike and overcome him, never let up in the pursuit so long as your men have strength to follow; for an army routed, if hotly pursued, becomes panic-stricken, and can then be destroyed by half their number.“

— Thomas Jackson
Context: Always mystify, mislead, and surprise the enemy, if possible; and when you strike and overcome him, never let up in the pursuit so long as your men have strength to follow; for an army routed, if hotly pursued, becomes panic-stricken, and can then be destroyed by half their number. The other rule is, never fight against heavy odds, if by any possible maneuvering you can hurl your own force on only a part, and that the weakest part, of your enemy and crush it. Such tactics will win every time, and a small army may thus destroy a large one in detail, and repeated victory will make it invincible. As quoted in Battles and Leaders of the Civil War (1884 - 1888) edited by Robert Underwood Clarence C. Buel, Vol. II, p. 297

„Good-breeding is opposed to selfishness, vanity, or pride.“

— Thomas Jackson
Context: Good-breeding is opposed to selfishness, vanity, or pride. Never weary your company by talking too long or too frequently.

Reklama

„We must make this campaign an exceedingly active one. Only thus can a weaker country cope with a stronger; it must make up in activity what it lacks in strength.“

— Thomas Jackson
Context: We must make this campaign an exceedingly active one. Only thus can a weaker country cope with a stronger; it must make up in activity what it lacks in strength. A defensive campaign can only be made successful by taking the aggressive at the proper time. Napoleon never waited for his adversary to become fully prepared, but struck him the first blow. Ch. 22 : The Last Happy Days — Chancellorsville — 1863, p. 429

„War means fighting. The business of the soldier is to fight.“

— Thomas Jackson
Context: War means fighting. The business of the soldier is to fight. Armies are not called out to dig trenches, to throw up breastworks, to live in camps, but to find the enemy and strike him; to invade his country, and do him all possible damage in the shortest possible time. This will involve great destruction of life and property while it lasts; but such a war will of necessity be of brief continuance, and so would be an economy of life and property in the end. To move swiftly, strike vigorously, and secure all the fruits of victory is the secret of successful war. As quoted in [http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/12233 Stonewall Jackson and the American Civil War (1904) by George Francis Robert Henderson], Ch. 25 : The Soldier and the Man, p. 481

„I have seen enough of it to make me look upon it as the sum of all evils.“

— Thomas Jackson
Context: If the general government should persist in the measures now threatened, there must be war. It is painful enough to discover with what unconcern they speak of war and threaten it. They do not know its horrors. I have seen enough of it to make me look upon it as the sum of all evils. Comments to his pastor (April 1861) as quoted in [http://books.google.com/books?id=bG2vg5cH004C Memoirs of Stonewall Jackson by His Widow Mary Anna Jackson (1895)], Ch. IX : War Clouds — 1860 - 1861, p. 141; This has sometimes been paraphrased as "War is the sum of all evils." Before Jackson's application of the term "The sum of all evils" to war, it had also been applied to slavery by abolitionist Cassius Marcellus Clay in The Writings of Cassius Marcellus Clay : Including Speeches and Addresses (1848), p. 445; to death by Georg Christian Knapp in Lectures on Christian Theology (1845), p. 404; and it had also been used, apparently in relation to arrogance in a translation of "Homily 24" in The Homilies of S. John Chrysostom on the First Epistle of St. Paul the Apostle to the Corinthians (1839), p. 331 <!-- earliest use thus far found ~ Kalki 2008·01·21 -->

„To move swiftly, strike vigorously, and secure all the fruits of victory is the secret of successful war.“

— Thomas Jackson
Context: War means fighting. The business of the soldier is to fight. Armies are not called out to dig trenches, to throw up breastworks, to live in camps, but to find the enemy and strike him; to invade his country, and do him all possible damage in the shortest possible time. This will involve great destruction of life and property while it lasts; but such a war will of necessity be of brief continuance, and so would be an economy of life and property in the end. To move swiftly, strike vigorously, and secure all the fruits of victory is the secret of successful war. As quoted in [http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/12233 Stonewall Jackson and the American Civil War (1904) by George Francis Robert Henderson], Ch. 25 : The Soldier and the Man, p. 481

Reklama

„I yield to no man in sympathy for the gallant men under my command; but I am obliged to sweat them tonight, so that I may save their blood tomorrow.“

— Thomas Jackson
Context: I yield to no man in sympathy for the gallant men under my command; but I am obliged to sweat them tonight, so that I may save their blood tomorrow. The line of hills southwest of Winchester must not be occupied by the enemy's artillery. My own must be there and in position by daylight. … You shall however have two hours rest. To Col. Sam Fulkerson, who reported on the weariness of their troops and suggested that they should be given an hour or so to rest from a forced march in the night. (24 May 1862); as quoted in Mighty Stonewall (1957) by Frank E. Vandiver, p. 250

„It is man's highest interest not to violate, or attempt to violate, the rules which Infinite Wisdom has laid down.“

— Thomas Jackson
Context: It is man's highest interest not to violate, or attempt to violate, the rules which Infinite Wisdom has laid down. The means by which men are to attain great elevation may be classed in three divisions — physical, mental, and moral. Whatever relates to health, belongs to the first; whatever relates to the improvement of the mind, belongs to the second. The formation of good manners and virtuous habits constitutes the third.

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