John Dryden cytaty

John Dryden Fotografia
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John Dryden

Data urodzenia: 19. Sierpień 1631
Data zgonu: 12. Maj 1700

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John Dryden – poeta i dramatopisarz angielski.

Cytaty John Dryden

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„Wystrzegaj się furii człowieka cierpliwego.“

— John Dryden
Źródło: Absalom and Achitophel, 1681

„How easie is it to call Rogue and Villain, and that wittily! But how hard to make a Man appear a Fool, a Blockhead, or a Knave, without using any of those opprobrious terms!“

— John Dryden
Context: How easie is it to call Rogue and Villain, and that wittily! But how hard to make a Man appear a Fool, a Blockhead, or a Knave, without using any of those opprobrious terms! To spare the grossness of the Names, and to do the thing yet more severely, is to draw a full Face, and to make the Nose and Cheeks stand out, and yet not to employ any depth of Shadowing. This is the Mystery of that Noble Trade, which yet no Master can teach to his Apprentice: He may give the Rules, but the Scholar is never the nearer in his practice. Neither is it true, that this fineness of Raillery is offensive. A witty Man is tickl'd while he is hurt in this manner, and a Fool feels it not. The occasion of an Offence may possibly be given, but he cannot take it. If it be granted that in effect this way does more Mischief; that a Man is secretly wounded, and though he be not sensible himself, yet the malicious World will find it for him: yet there is still a vast difference betwixt the slovenly Butchering of a Man, and the fineness of a stroke that separates the Head from the Body, and leaves it standing in its place. A Discourse concerning the Original and Progress of Satire (1693).

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„If others in the same Glass better see
'Tis for Themselves they look, but not for me:
For my Salvation must its Doom receive
Not from what others, but what I believe.“

— John Dryden
Context: More Safe, and much more modest 'tis, to say God wou'd not leave Mankind without a way: And that the Scriptures, though not every where Free from Corruption, or intire, or clear, Are uncorrupt, sufficient, clear, intire, In all things which our needfull Faith require. If others in the same Glass better see 'Tis for Themselves they look, but not for me: For my Salvation must its Doom receive Not from what others, but what I believe. Religio Laici (1682).

„Content with poverty, my soul I arm;
And virtue, though in rags, will keep me warm.“

— John Dryden
Context: I can enjoy her while she's kind; But when she dances in the wind, And shakes the wings and will not stay, I puff the prostitute away: The little or the much she gave is quietly resign'd: Content with poverty, my soul I arm; And virtue, though in rags, will keep me warm. On Fortune; Book III, Ode 29, lines 81–87.

„Not heaven itself upon the past has power;
But what has been, has been, and I have had my hour.“

— John Dryden
Context: Be fair, or foul, or rain, or shine, The joys I have possessed, in spite of fate, are mine. Not heaven itself upon the past has power; But what has been, has been, and I have had my hour. Book III, Ode 29, lines 69–72.

„None but the brave deserves the fair.“

— John Dryden
Context: Happy, happy, happy pair! None but the brave, None but the brave, None but the brave deserves the fair. l. 12–15.

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„Beware the Fury of a Patient Man.“

— John Dryden
Context: Oh that my Pow'r to Saving were confin’d: Why am I forc’d, like Heav’n, against my mind, To make Examples of another Kind? Must I at length the Sword of Justice draw? Oh curst Effects of necessary Law! How ill my Fear they by my Mercy scan, Beware the Fury of a Patient Man. Pt. I, line 999–1005. Compare Publius Syrus, Maxim 289, "Furor fit læsa sæpius patientia" ("An over-taxed patience gives way to fierce anger").

„I am as free as Nature first made man,
Ere the base laws of servitude began“

— John Dryden
Context: I am as free as Nature first made man, Ere the base laws of servitude began, When wild in woods the noble savage ran. Part 1, Act I, scene i.

„If all the world be worth thy winning.
Think, oh think it worth enjoying:
Lovely Thaïs sits beside thee,
Take the good the gods provide thee.“

— John Dryden
Context: Softly sweet, in Lydian measures, Soon he soothed his soul to pleasures. War, he sung, is toil and trouble; Honor but an empty bubble; Never ending, still beginning, Fighting still, and still destroying. If all the world be worth thy winning. Think, oh think it worth enjoying: Lovely Thaïs sits beside thee, Take the good the gods provide thee. l. 97–106.

„The wise, for cure, on exercise depend;
God never made his work for man to mend.“

— John Dryden
Context: Better to hunt in fields, for health unbought, Than fee the doctor for a nauseous draught. The wise, for cure, on exercise depend; God never made his work for man to mend. Epistle to John Driden of Chesterton (1700), lines 92–95.

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