John Dryden cytaty

John Dryden Fotografia
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John Dryden

Data urodzenia: 19. Sierpień 1631
Data zgonu: 12. Maj 1700

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John Dryden – poeta i dramatopisarz angielski.

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Cytaty John Dryden

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„Wystrzegaj się furii człowieka cierpliwego.“

— John Dryden
Źródło: Absalom and Achitophel, 1681

„It is almost impossible to translate verbally and well at the same time“

— John Dryden
Context: It is almost impossible to translate verbally and well at the same time; for the Latin (a most severe and compendious language) often expresses that in one word which either the barbarity or the narrowness of modern tongues cannot supply in more.... But since every language is so full of its own proprieties that what is beautiful in one is often barbarous, nay, sometimes nonsense, in another, it would be unreasonable to limit a translator to the narrow compass of his author's words; it is enough if he choose out some expression which does not vitiate the sense. Works of John Dryden (1803) as quoted by P. Fleury Mottelay in William Gilbert of Colchester (1893)

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„To begin then with Shakespeare; he was the man who of all Modern, and perhaps Ancient Poets, had the largest and most comprehensive soul.“

— John Dryden
Context: To begin then with Shakespeare; he was the man who of all Modern, and perhaps Ancient Poets, had the largest and most comprehensive soul. All the Images of Nature were still present to him, and he drew them not laboriously, but luckily: when he describes any thing, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation: he was naturally learn'd; he needed not the spectacles of Books to read Nature; he look'd inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he is every where alike; were he so, I should do him injury to compare him with the greatest of Mankind. He is many times flat, insipid; his Comick wit degenerating into clenches; his serious swelling into Bombast. But he is alwayes great, when some great occasion is presented to him: no man can say he ever had a fit subject for his wit, and did not then raise himself as high above the rest of the Poets Essay of Dramatick Poesie (1668)

„From harmony, from heavenly harmony,
This universal frame began:
From harmony to harmony
Through all the compass of the notes it ran,
The diapason closing full in Man.“

— John Dryden
Context: From harmony, from heavenly harmony, This universal frame began: When nature underneath a heap Of jarring atoms lay, And could not heave her head, The tuneful voice was heard from high, 'Arise, ye more than dead!' Then cold, and hot, and moist, and dry, In order to their stations leap, And Music's power obey. From harmony, from heavenly harmony, This universal frame began: From harmony to harmony Through all the compass of the notes it ran, The diapason closing full in Man. St. 1.

„The wise, for cure, on exercise depend;
God never made his work for man to mend.“

— John Dryden
Context: Better to hunt in fields, for health unbought, Than fee the doctor for a nauseous draught. The wise, for cure, on exercise depend; God never made his work for man to mend. Epistle to John Driden of Chesterton (1700), lines 92–95.

„I am as free as Nature first made man,
Ere the base laws of servitude began“

— John Dryden
Context: I am as free as Nature first made man, Ere the base laws of servitude began, When wild in woods the noble savage ran. Part 1, Act I, scene i.

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„If all the world be worth thy winning.
Think, oh think it worth enjoying:
Lovely Thaïs sits beside thee,
Take the good the gods provide thee.“

— John Dryden
Context: Softly sweet, in Lydian measures, Soon he soothed his soul to pleasures. War, he sung, is toil and trouble; Honor but an empty bubble; Never ending, still beginning, Fighting still, and still destroying. If all the world be worth thy winning. Think, oh think it worth enjoying: Lovely Thaïs sits beside thee, Take the good the gods provide thee. l. 97–106.

„Preventing angels met it half the way,
And sent us back to praise, who came to pray.“

— John Dryden
Context: Our vows are heard betimes! and Heaven takes care To grant, before we can conclude the prayer: Preventing angels met it half the way, And sent us back to praise, who came to pray. Britannia Rediviva (1688), line 1.

„Not heaven itself upon the past has power;
But what has been, has been, and I have had my hour.“

— John Dryden
Context: Be fair, or foul, or rain, or shine, The joys I have possessed, in spite of fate, are mine. Not heaven itself upon the past has power; But what has been, has been, and I have had my hour. Book III, Ode 29, lines 69–72.

„None but the brave deserves the fair.“

— John Dryden
Context: Happy, happy, happy pair! None but the brave, None but the brave, None but the brave deserves the fair. l. 12–15.

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