Joseph Addison cytaty

Joseph Addison Fotografia
5  0

Joseph Addison

Data urodzenia: 1. Maj 1672
Data zgonu: 17. Czerwiec 1719

Reklama

Joseph Addison – angielski pisarz, publicysta i polityk. Uważany za pioniera nowożytnego dziennikarstwa.

Podobni autorzy

Norman Angell Fotografia
Norman Angell
angielski dziennikarz i polityk, noblista
Tomasz Morus Fotografia
Tomasz Morus11
angielski myśliciel, pisarz i polityk

Cytaty Joseph Addison

Reklama

„Reading is to the mind, what exercise is to the body.“

— Joseph Addison
Context: Reading is to the mind, what exercise is to the body. As by the one, health is preserved, strengthened, and invigorated: by the other, virtue (which is the health of the mind) is kept alive, cherished, and confirmed. No. 147.

„A man's first care should be to avoid the reproaches of his own heart; his next to escape the censures of the world“

— Joseph Addison
Context: A man's first care should be to avoid the reproaches of his own heart; his next to escape the censures of the world: if the last interferes with the former, it ought to be entirely neglected; but otherwise there cannot be a greater satisfaction to an honest mind, than to see those approbations which it gives itself seconded by the applauses of the public: a man is more sure of his conduct, when the verdict which he passes upon his own behaviour is thus warranted and confirmed by the opinion of all that know him. On "Sir Roger", in The Spectator No. 122 (20 July 1711).

„At the same time that I think discretion the most useful talent a man can be master of, I look upon cunning to be the accomplishment of little, mean, ungenerous minds.“

— Joseph Addison
Context: At the same time that I think discretion the most useful talent a man can be master of, I look upon cunning to be the accomplishment of little, mean, ungenerous minds. Discretion points out the noblest ends to us, and pursues the most proper and laudable methods of attaining them: cunning has only private selfish aims, and sticks at nothing which may make them succeed. Discretion has large and extended views, and, like a well-formed eye, commands a whole horizon: cunning is a kind of short-sightedness, that discovers the minutest objects which are near at hand, but is not able to discern things at a distance. Discretion the more it is discovered, gives a greater authority to the person who possesses it: cunning, when it is once detected, loses its force, and makes a man incapable of bringing about even those events which he might have done had he passed only for a plain man. Discretion is the perfection of reason, and a guide to us in all the duties of life: cunning is a kind of instinct, that only looks out after our immediate interest and welfare. Discretion is only found in men of strong sense and good understandings, cunning is often to be met with in brutes themselves, and in persons who are but the fewest removes from them. No. 225.

Reklama

„Let echo, too, perform her part, Prolonging every note with art“

— Joseph Addison
Context: Let echo, too, perform her part, Prolonging every note with art; And in a low expiring strain, Play all the concert o'er again. Ode for St. Cecilia's Day (1699), st. 4.

„Keep up the loud harmonious song,
And imitate the blest above,
In joy, and harmony, and love.“

— Joseph Addison
Context: Consecrate the place and day To music and Cecilia. Let no rough winds approach, nor dare Invade the hallow'd bounds, Nor rudely shake the tuneful air, Nor spoil the fleeting sounds. Nor mournful sigh nor groan be heard, But gladness dwell on every tongue; Whilst all, with voice and strings prepar'd, Keep up the loud harmonious song, And imitate the blest above, In joy, and harmony, and love. Song for St. Cecilia's Day (1692).

„Discretion has large and extended views, and, like a well-formed eye, commands a whole horizon: cunning is a kind of short-sightedness, that discovers the minutest objects which are near at hand, but is not able to discern things at a distance. Discretion the more it is discovered, gives a greater authority to the person who possesses it: cunning, when it is once detected, loses its force, and makes a man incapable of bringing about even those events which he might have done had he passed only for a plain man.“

— Joseph Addison
Context: At the same time that I think discretion the most useful talent a man can be master of, I look upon cunning to be the accomplishment of little, mean, ungenerous minds. Discretion points out the noblest ends to us, and pursues the most proper and laudable methods of attaining them: cunning has only private selfish aims, and sticks at nothing which may make them succeed. Discretion has large and extended views, and, like a well-formed eye, commands a whole horizon: cunning is a kind of short-sightedness, that discovers the minutest objects which are near at hand, but is not able to discern things at a distance. Discretion the more it is discovered, gives a greater authority to the person who possesses it: cunning, when it is once detected, loses its force, and makes a man incapable of bringing about even those events which he might have done had he passed only for a plain man. Discretion is the perfection of reason, and a guide to us in all the duties of life: cunning is a kind of instinct, that only looks out after our immediate interest and welfare. Discretion is only found in men of strong sense and good understandings, cunning is often to be met with in brutes themselves, and in persons who are but the fewest removes from them. No. 225.

„Transported with the view, I'm lost
In wonder, love and praise.“

— Joseph Addison
Context: When all thy mercies, O my God, My rising soul surveys, Transported with the view, I'm lost In wonder, love and praise. No. 453 (9 August 1712).

Reklama

„Eternity! thou pleasing dreadful thought!“

— Joseph Addison
Context: Eternity! thou pleasing dreadful thought! Through what variety of untried being, Through what new scenes and changes must we pass! Act V, scene i.

„The Fear of Death often proves Mortal“

— Joseph Addison
Context: The Fear of Death often proves Mortal, and sets People on Methods to save their Lives, which infallibly destroy them. No. 25 (29 March 1711).

„Great souls by instinct to each other turn,
Demand alliance, and in friendship burn“

— Joseph Addison
Context: Great souls by instinct to each other turn, Demand alliance, and in friendship burn; A sudden friendship, while with stretched-out rays They meet each other, mingling blaze with blaze. Polished in courts, and hardened in the field, Renowned for conquest, and in council skilled, Their courage dwells not in a troubled flood Of mounting spirits, and fermenting blood: Lodged in the soul, with virtue overruled, Inflamed by reason, and by reason cooled, In hours of peace content to be unknown. And only in the field of battle shown: To souls like these, in mutual friendship joined, Heaven dares intrust the cause of humankind. Line 101.

„Music, the greatest good that mortals know,And all of heaven we have below.“

— Joseph Addison
Context: Music, the greatest good that mortals know, And all of heaven we have below. Song for St. Cecilia's Day (1692), st. 3.

Natępna
Dzisiejsze rocznice
Budd Schulberg Fotografia
Budd Schulberg
1914 - 2009
Miguel Enríquez Fotografia
Miguel Enríquez
1944 - 1974
Andrzej Iwiński1
1934 - 2013
Farley Granger Fotografia
Farley Granger
1925 - 2011
Następnych dzisiejszych rocznic
Podobni autorzy
Norman Angell Fotografia
Norman Angell
angielski dziennikarz i polityk, noblista
Tomasz Morus Fotografia
Tomasz Morus11
angielski myśliciel, pisarz i polityk