Thomas Henry Huxley cytaty

Thomas Henry Huxley Fotografia
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Thomas Henry Huxley

Data urodzenia: 4. Maj 1825
Data zgonu: 29. Czerwiec 1895
Natępne imiona:Thomas Huxley

Reklama

Thomas Henry Huxley – angielski zoolog, paleontolog, filozof i fizjolog, z wykształcenia lekarz, członek Royal Society, w latach 1883-1885 jego prezes, profesor Royal School of Mines i Royal College of Surgeons.

Był obrońcą i propagatorem darwinizmu, a także pionierem kierunku ewolucyjnego w naukach zoologicznych. Twierdził, że proces ewolucji dotyczy również człowieka . Adwersarz biskupa Oksfordu Samuela Wilberforce'a w słynnej debacie oksfordzkiej z 1860 roku pomiędzy ewolucjonistami a kreacjonistami. Przez złośliwych zwany buldogiem Darwina.

Badał pochodzenie płazów i ptaków oraz czaszki kręgowców. Ustalił genealogię konia i wykazał pochodzenie ptaków od gadów kopalnych i pochodzenie płazów od ryb. Badał również przemianę pokoleń u jamochłonów oraz podobieństwo ich budowy do listków zarodkowych. W poglądach filozoficznych reprezentował agnostycyzm.

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Cytaty Thomas Henry Huxley

Reklama

„Wiedza to nic innego jak unaukowiony i usystematyzowany zdrowy rozsądek.“

— Thomas Henry Huxley
Źródło: Walery Pisarek, Wstęp do nauki o komunikowaniu, Wydawnictwa Akademickie i Profesjonalne, Warszawa 2008, s. 17.

Reklama

„The antagonism between science and religion, about which we hear so much, appears to me to be purely factitious“

— Thomas Henry Huxley
Context: The antagonism between science and religion, about which we hear so much, appears to me to be purely factitious — fabricated, on the one hand, by short-sighted religious people who confound a certain branch of science, theology, with religion; and, on the other, by equally short-sighted scientific people who forget that science takes for its province only that which is susceptible of clear intellectual comprehension; and that, outside the boundaries of that province, they must be content with imagination, with hope, and with ignorance. "The interpreters of Genesis and the interpreters of Nature" (1885) http://aleph0.clarku.edu/huxley/CE4/GeNat.html

Reklama

„When I reached intellectual maturity and began to ask myself whether I was an atheist, a theist, or a pantheist; a materialist or an idealist; Christian or a freethinker; I found that the more I learned and reflected, the less ready was the answer; until, at last, I came to the conclusion that I had neither art nor part with any of these denominations, except the last.“

— Thomas Henry Huxley
Context: When I reached intellectual maturity and began to ask myself whether I was an atheist, a theist, or a pantheist; a materialist or an idealist; Christian or a freethinker; I found that the more I learned and reflected, the less ready was the answer; until, at last, I came to the conclusion that I had neither art nor part with any of these denominations, except the last. The one thing in which most of these good people were agreed was the one thing in which I differed from them. They were quite sure they had attained a certain "gnosis," — had, more or less successfully, solved the problem of existence; while I was quite sure I had not, and had a pretty strong conviction that the problem was insoluble. So I took thought, and invented what I conceived to be the appropriate title of "agnostic." It came into my head as suggestively antithetic to the "gnostic" of Church history, who professed to know so much about the very things of which I was ignorant. To my great satisfaction the term took.

„I do not mean to suggest that scientific differences should be settled by universal suffrage, but I do conceive that solid proofs must be met by something more than empty and unsupported assertions.“

— Thomas Henry Huxley
Context: I do not mean to suggest that scientific differences should be settled by universal suffrage, but I do conceive that solid proofs must be met by something more than empty and unsupported assertions. Yet during the two years through which this preposterous controversy has dragged its weary length, Professor Owen has not ventured to bring forward a single preparation in support of his often-repeated assertions. The case stands thus, therefore: Not only are the statements made by me in consonance with the doctrines of the best older authorities, and with those of all recent investigators, but I am quite ready to demonstrate them on the first monkey that comes to hand; while Professor Owen's assertions are not only in diametrical opposition to both old and new authorities, but he has not produced, and, I will add, cannot produce, a single preparation which justifies them. A Succinct History of the Controversy respecting the Cerebral Structure of Man and the Apes, Evidence as to Man's place in Nature (1863)

„The saying that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing is, to my mind, a very dangerous adage.“

— Thomas Henry Huxley
Context: The saying that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing is, to my mind, a very dangerous adage. If knowledge is real and genuine, I do not believe that it is other than a very valuable possession, however infinitesimal its quantity may be. Indeed, if a little knowledge is dangerous, where is the man who has so much as to be out of danger? "On Elementary Instruction in Physiology" (1877) http://aleph0.clarku.edu/huxley/CE3/ElPhys.html

„His voice was low, clear and distinct... Professor Huxley's method is slow, precise, and clear, and he guards the positions that he takes with astuteness and ability.“

— Thomas Henry Huxley
Context: His voice was low, clear and distinct... Professor Huxley's method is slow, precise, and clear, and he guards the positions that he takes with astuteness and ability. He does not utter anything in reckless fashion which conviction sometimes countenances and excuses, but rather with the deliberation that research and close inquiry foster. Newspaper account of speech at opening of Johns Hopkins University (13 September 1876), quoted in The Great Influenza : The Epic Story of the Deadliest Plague in History (2005) by John M. Barry, p. 13

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