Susan Sontag cytaty

Susan Sontag Fotografia
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Susan Sontag

Data urodzenia: 16. Styczeń 1933
Data zgonu: 28. Grudzień 2004
Natępne imiona:സൂസൻ സൊൻടാഗ്,Susan Sontagová

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Susan Sontag – amerykańska pisarka, eseistka, krytyczka społeczna i aktywistka praw człowieka. Jej książki przetłumaczono na ponad 30 języków.

Cytaty Susan Sontag

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„Jesteśmy bardzo wrażliwi na okropności podawane w formie obrazów fotograficznych, wrażliwsi niż w realnym życiu.“

— Susan Sontag
Źródło: Monika Bokiniec, Barbara Forysiewicz, Jacek Michałowski, Natalia Mrozkowiak-Nastrożna, Grzegorz Nazaruk, Magdalena Sacha, Grażyna Świętochowska, Spotkania z kulturą. Podręcznik do wiedzy o kulturze dla liceum i technikum, wyd. Nowa Era, Warszawa 2012, ISBN 9788326707926.

„I haven't been everywhere, but it's on my list.“

— Susan Sontag
Context: A curious word, wanderlust. I'm ready to go. I've already gone. Regretfully, exultantly. A prouder lyricism. It's not Paradise that's lost. Advice. Move along, let's get cracking, don’t hold me down, he travels fastest who travels alone. Let's get the show on the road. Get up, slugabed. I'm clearing out of here. Get your ass in gear. Sleep faster, we need the pillow. She's racing, he's stalling. If I go this fast, I won't see anything. If I slow down — Everything. — then I won't have seen everything before it disappears. Everywhere. I've been everywhere. I haven't been everywhere, but it's on my list. Land's end. But there's water, O my heart. And salt on my tongue. The end of the world. This is not the end of the world. "Unguided Tour", in The New Yorker (31 October 1977), final lines; also in I, Etcetera (1977)

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„My library is an archive of longings.“

— Susan Sontag, As Consciousness is Harnessed to Flesh: Journals and Notebooks, 1964-1980

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„From now to the end of consciousness, we are stuck with the task of defending art.“

— Susan Sontag
Context: None of us can ever retrieve that innocence before all theory when art knew no need to justify itself, when one did not ask of a work of art what it said because one knew (or thought one knew) what it did. From now to the end of consciousness, we are stuck with the task of defending art. We can only quarrel with one or another means of defense. Indeed, we have an obligation to overthrow any means of defending and justifying art which becomes particularly obtuse or onerous or insensitive to contemporary needs and practices. This is the case, today, with the very idea of content itself. Whatever it may have been in the past, the idea of content is today mainly a hindrance, a nuisance, a subtle or not so subtle philistinism. "Against Interpretation" (1964), p. 5

„Reality has come to seem more and more like what we are shown by cameras.“

— Susan Sontag
Context: Reality has come to seem more and more like what we are shown by cameras. It is common now for people to insist upon their experience of a violent event in which they were caught up — a plane crash, a shoot-out, a terrorist bombing — that "it seemed like a movie." This is said, other descriptions seeming insufficient, in order to explain how real it was. While many people in non-industrialized countries still feel apprehensive when being photographed, divining it to be some kind of trespass, an act of disrespect, a sublimated looting of the personality or the culture, people in industrialized countries seek to have their photographs taken — feel that they are images, and are made real by photographs. "The Image-World", p. 161

„The charges against most of the people detained in the prisons in Iraq and Afghanistan being nonexistent — the Red Cross reports that 70 to 90 percent of those being held seem to have committed no crime other than simply being in the wrong place at the wrong time, caught up in some sweep of "suspects" — the principal justification for holding them is "interrogation." Interrogation about what? About anything.“

— Susan Sontag
Context: The charges against most of the people detained in the prisons in Iraq and Afghanistan being nonexistent — the Red Cross reports that 70 to 90 percent of those being held seem to have committed no crime other than simply being in the wrong place at the wrong time, caught up in some sweep of "suspects" — the principal justification for holding them is "interrogation." Interrogation about what? About anything. Whatever the detainee might know. If interrogation is the point of detaining prisoners indefinitely, then physical coercion, humiliation and torture become inevitable. Remember: we are not talking about that rarest of cases, the "ticking time bomb" situation, which is sometimes used as a limiting case that justifies torture of prisoners who have knowledge of an imminent attack. This is general or nonspecific information-gathering, authorized by American military and civilian administrators to learn more of a shadowy empire of evildoers about whom Americans know virtually nothing, in countries about which they are singularly ignorant: in principle, any information at all might be useful. An interrogation that produced no information (whatever information might consist of) would count as a failure.

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