Arthur Wellesley, 1. książę Wellington cytaty

Arthur Wellesley, 1. książę Wellington Fotografia
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Arthur Wellesley, 1. książę Wellington

Data urodzenia: 1. Maj 1769
Data zgonu: 14. Wrzesień 1852
Natępne imiona:Arthur Wellesley, I duca di Wellington, Duca di Wellington

Reklama

Arthur Wellesley, 1. książę Wellington KG, GCB, GCH – brytyjski arystokrata, wojskowy i polityk.

Pochodził ze zubożałej anglo-irlandzkiej rodziny szlacheckiej, która zmieniła nazwisko z Wesley na Wellesley. Był trzecim synem Garreta Wesleya, który nosił tytuł pierwszego hrabiego Mornington. W latach 1781-1785 młody Wellesley pobierał nauki w Eton, a później, z powodu słabych wyników w Eton, w sławnej wojskowej akademii francuskiej w Angers.

Największą sławę zdobył w okresie wojen napoleońskich, przede wszystkim jako zwycięzca – wspólnie z Blücherem – pod Waterloo . Wcześniej z powodzeniem walczył z wojskami francuskimi w Hiszpanii i Portugalii oraz reprezentował Wielką Brytanię na kongresie wiedeńskim. Jeden z przywódców torysów, w latach 1828–1830 i przejściowo w 1834 r. pełnił funkcję premiera. Od 1847 r. był członkiem Royal Society.

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Cytaty Arthur Wellesley, 1. książę Wellington

„Chciałbym nadejścia Prusaków lub nocy.“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1. książę Wellington
cytat przypisywany, wypowiedziany ponoć, gdy oddziały brytyjskie zostały zdziesiątkowane w trakcie bitwy pod Waterloo; w języku angielskim zdanie to jest najczęściej cytowane w formie Podaruj mi noc albo ześlij mi Blüchera (Give me the night or give me Blücher!)

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„Mięso armatnie i tyle.“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1. książę Wellington
Anne Hill Wellesley, lady Mornington (matka Arthura Wellesleya)

„Bez niego nie zwyciężylibyśmy.“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1. książę Wellington
o generale Johnie Moore – słowa z 1809 dotyczące jego udziału w bitwie pod La Coruñą.

„Napoleon has humbugged me, by God“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington
Context: Napoleon has humbugged me, by God; he has gained twenty-four hours' march on me. At the Duchess of Richmond's ball (15 June 1815), as quoted in Camps, Quarters, and Casual Places http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/9460 (1896) by Archibald Forbes, quotes Captain Bowles account and citing the Letters of the First Earl of Malmesbury.

„It has been a damned serious business“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington
Context: It has been a damned serious business... Blucher and I have lost 30,000 men. It has been a damned nice thing — the nearest run thing you ever saw in your life. … By God! I don't think it would have been done if I had not been there. Remark to Thomas Creevey (18 June 1815), using the word nice in an older sense of "uncertain, delicately balanced", about the Battle of Waterloo. Creevy, a civilian, got a public interview with Wellington at headquarters, and quoted the remark in his book Creevey Papers (1903), in Ch. X, on p. 236; the phrase "a damned nice thing" has sometimes been paraphrased as "a damn close-run thing."

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„It has been a damned nice thing — the nearest run thing you ever saw in your life.“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington
Context: It has been a damned serious business... Blucher and I have lost 30,000 men. It has been a damned nice thing — the nearest run thing you ever saw in your life. … By God! I don't think it would have been done if I had not been there. Remark to Thomas Creevey (18 June 1815), using the word nice in an older sense of "uncertain, delicately balanced", about the Battle of Waterloo. Creevy, a civilian, got a public interview with Wellington at headquarters, and quoted the remark in his book Creevey Papers (1903), in Ch. X, on p. 236; the phrase "a damned nice thing" has sometimes been paraphrased as "a damn close-run thing."

„The history of a battle, is not unlike the history of a ball. Some individuals may recollect all the little events of which the great result is the battle won or lost, but no individual can recollect the order in which, or the exact moment at which, they occurred, which makes all the difference as to their value or importance.“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington
Context: The history of a battle, is not unlike the history of a ball. Some individuals may recollect all the little events of which the great result is the battle won or lost, but no individual can recollect the order in which, or the exact moment at which, they occurred, which makes all the difference as to their value or importance... Letter to John Croker (8 August 1815), as quoted in The History of England from the Accession of James II (1848) by Thomas Babington Macaulay, Volume I Chapter 5 http://www.worldwideschool.org/library/books/hst/european/TheHistoryofEnglandfromtheAccessionofJamesIIVol1/chap5.html, p. 180.; and in The Waterloo Letters (1891) edited by H. T. Sibome

„Believe me, nothing except a battle lost can be half so melancholy as a battle won: the bravery of my troops hitherto saved me from the greater evil; but to win such a battle as this of Waterloo, at the expens of so many gallant friends, could only be termed a heavy misfortune but for the result to the public.“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington
Context: My heart is broken by the terrible loss I have sustained in my old friends and companions and my poor soldiers. Believe me, nothing except a battle lost can be half so melancholy as a battle won: the bravery of my troops hitherto saved me from the greater evil; but to win such a battle as this of Waterloo, at the expens of so many gallant friends, could only be termed a heavy misfortune but for the result to the public. Letter from the field of Waterloo (June 1815), as quoted in Decisive Battles of the World (1899) by Edward Shepherd Creasy. Quoted too in Memorable Battles in English History: Where Fought, why Fought, and Their Results; with the Military Lives of the Commanders by William Henry Davenport Adams; Editor Griffith and Farran, 1863. p. 400.

„All the business of war, and indeed all the business of life, is to endeavour to find out what you don't know by what you do; that's what I called "guessing what was at the other side of the hill."“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington
Statement in conversation with John Croker https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Wilson_Croker and Croker's wife (4 September 1852), as quoted in The Croker Papers: The Correspondence and Diaries of the Late Right Honourable John Wilson Croker, LL.Dm F.R.S, Secretary of the Admiralty from 1809 to 1830 (1884), edited by Louis J. Jennings, Vol.III, p. 276.

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„There is no mistake; there has been no mistake; and there shall be no mistake.“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington
In response to William Huskisson declaring there had been a mistake, and he had not intended to resign, after Wellington chose to interpret a letter to him detailing his obligation to vote for a measure opposed by him as a letter of resignation. As quoted in The Military and Political Life of Arthur Wellesley: Duke of Wellington (1852) by "A Citizen of the World", and in Wellingtoniana (1852), edited by John Timbs.

„The Battle of Waterloo was won on the playing fields of Eton.“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington
As quoted in The New York Times (26 December 1886), and in Words on Wellington (1889) by Sir William Fraser, this is almost certainly apocryphal. The first attributions of such a remark to Wellington were in De l'Avenir politique de l'Angleterre (1856) by Charles de Montalembert, Ch. 10, where it is stated that on returning to Eton in old age he had said: "C'est ici qu'a été gagnée la bataille de Waterloo." This was afterwards quoted in Self-Help (1859) by Samuel Smiles as "It was there that the Battle of Waterloo was won!" Later in Memoirs of Eminent Etonians (2nd Edition, 1876) by Sir Edward Creasy, he is quoted as saying as he passed groups playing cricket on the playing-fields: "There grows the stuff that won Waterloo." Elizabeth Longford in Wellington — The Years of the Sword (1969) states he "probably never said or thought anything of the kind" and Gerald Wellesley, 7th Duke of Wellington in a letter published in The Times in 1972 is quoted as stating: "During his old age Wellington is recorded to have visited Eton on two occasions only and it is unlikely that he came more often. … Wellington's career at Eton was short and inglorious and, unlike his elder brother, he had no particular affection for the place. … Quite apart from the fact that the authority for attributing the words to Wellington is of the flimsiest description, to anyone who knows his turn of phrase they ring entirely false."

„I used to say of him that his presence on the field made the difference of forty thousand men.“

—  Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington
On Napoleon Bonaparte, in notes for 2 November 1831; later, in the notes for 18 September 1836, he is quoted as saying:

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