„A point of view can be a dangerous luxury when substituted for insight and
understanding.“

Marshall McLuhan Fotografia
Marshall McLuhan7
kanadyjski teoretyk komunikacji 1918 - 1980
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Marshall McLuhan Fotografia

„A moral point of view too often serves as a substitute for understanding in technological matters. (p. 245)“

—  Marshall McLuhan Canadian educator, philosopher, and scholar-- a professor of English literature, a literary critic, and a communica... 1918 - 1980

Marshall McLuhan Fotografia

„Innis sacrificed point of view and prestige to his sense of the urgent need for insight.“

—  Marshall McLuhan Canadian educator, philosopher, and scholar-- a professor of English literature, a literary critic, and a communica... 1918 - 1980
Context: There is nothing willful or arbitrary about the Innis mode of expression. Were it to be translated into perspective prose, it would not only require huge space, but the insight into the modes of interplay among forms of organisation would also be lost. Innis sacrificed point of view and prestige to his sense of the urgent need for insight. A point of view can be a dangerous luxury when substituted for insight and understanding. As Innis got more insight he abandoned any mere point of view in his presentation of knowledge. When he interrelates the development of the steam press with 'the consolidation of the vernaculars' and the rise of nationalism and revolution he is not reporting anybody's point of view, least of all his own. He is setting up a mosaic configuration or galaxy for insight … Innis makes no effort to "spell out" the interrelations between the components in his galaxy. He offers no consumer packages in his later work, but only do-it-yourself kits... p. 216; this paragraph was quoted as "context (0) - THE INNIS MODE" by John Brunner, the epigraph or first chapter in his novel Stand on Zanzibar (1968)

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Douglas Adams Fotografia
Marshall McLuhan Fotografia

„As Innis got more insight he abandoned any mere point of view in his presentation of knowledge.“

—  Marshall McLuhan Canadian educator, philosopher, and scholar-- a professor of English literature, a literary critic, and a communica... 1918 - 1980
Context: There is nothing willful or arbitrary about the Innis mode of expression. Were it to be translated into perspective prose, it would not only require huge space, but the insight into the modes of interplay among forms of organisation would also be lost. Innis sacrificed point of view and prestige to his sense of the urgent need for insight. A point of view can be a dangerous luxury when substituted for insight and understanding. As Innis got more insight he abandoned any mere point of view in his presentation of knowledge. When he interrelates the development of the steam press with 'the consolidation of the vernaculars' and the rise of nationalism and revolution he is not reporting anybody's point of view, least of all his own. He is setting up a mosaic configuration or galaxy for insight … Innis makes no effort to "spell out" the interrelations between the components in his galaxy. He offers no consumer packages in his later work, but only do-it-yourself kits... p. 216; this paragraph was quoted as "context (0) - THE INNIS MODE" by John Brunner, the epigraph or first chapter in his novel Stand on Zanzibar (1968)

Constantine P. Cavafy Fotografia

„That's certainly one point of view. Quite understandable.“

—  Constantine P. Cavafy Greek poet 1863 - 1933
Context: The Spartans weren't to be led and ordered around like precious servants. Besides, they wouldn't have thought a pan-Hellenic expedition without a Spartan king in command was to be taken very seriously. Of course, then, "except the Lacedaimonians." That's certainly one point of view. Quite understandable. " In The Year 200 B.C. http://cavafis.compupress.gr/kave_1.htm" (1931)

Brian Greene Fotografia

„Understanding requires insight. Insight must be anchored.“

—  Brian Greene, The Fabric of the Cosmos: Space, Time, and the Texture of Reality

Paul Dirac Fotografia

„It seems that if one is working from the point of view of getting beauty in one's equations, and if one has really a sound insight, one is on a sure line of progress.“

—  Paul Dirac theoretical physicist 1902 - 1984
Context: It seems that if one is working from the point of view of getting beauty in one's equations, and if one has really a sound insight, one is on a sure line of progress. If there is not complete agreement between the results of one's work and experiment, one should not allow oneself to be too discouraged, because the discrepancy may well be due to minor features that are not properly taken into account and that will get cleared up with further development of the theory.

Mahasi Sayadaw Fotografia
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Lawrence M. Krauss Fotografia

„It is a shame when nonsense can substitute for fact with impunity.“

—  Lawrence M. Krauss American physicist 1954
In a panel discussion on Real Time with Bill Maher, 02/08/2013

George Bernard Shaw Fotografia

„Take the case of the extermination of Jesus Christ. No doubt there was a strong case for it. Jesus was from the point of view of the High Priest a heretic and an impostor. From the point of view of the merchants he was a rioter and a Communist. From the Roman Imperialist point of view he was a traitor. From the commonsense point of view he was a dangerous madman. From the snobbish point of view, always a very influential one, he was a penniless vagrant.“

—  George Bernard Shaw Irish playwright 1856 - 1950
Context: I dislike cruelty, even cruelty to other people, and should therefore like to see all cruel people exterminated. But I should recoil with horror from a proposal to punish them. Let me illustrate my attitude by a very famous, indeed far too famous, example of the popular conception of criminal law as a means of delivering up victims to the normal popular lust for cruelty which has been mortified by the restraint imposed on it by civilization. Take the case of the extermination of Jesus Christ. No doubt there was a strong case for it. Jesus was from the point of view of the High Priest a heretic and an impostor. From the point of view of the merchants he was a rioter and a Communist. From the Roman Imperialist point of view he was a traitor. From the commonsense point of view he was a dangerous madman. From the snobbish point of view, always a very influential one, he was a penniless vagrant. From the police point of view he was an obstructor of thoroughfares, a beggar, an associate of prostitutes, an apologist of sinners, and a disparager of judges; and his daily companions were tramps whom he had seduced into vagabondage from their regular trades. From the point of view of the pious he was a Sabbath breaker, a denier of the efficacy of circumcision and the advocate of a strange rite of baptism, a gluttonous man and a winebibber. He was abhorrent to the medical profession as an unqualified practitioner who healed people by quackery and charged nothing for the treatment. He was not anti-Christ: nobody had heard of such a power of darkness then; but he was startlingly anti-Moses. He was against the priests, against the judiciary, against the military, against the city (he declared that it was impossible for a rich man to enter the kingdom of heaven), against all the interests, classes, principalities and powers, inviting everybody to abandon all these and follow him. By every argument, legal, political, religious, customary, and polite, he was the most complete enemy of the society of his time ever brought to the bar. He was guilty on every count of the indictment, and on many more that his accusers had not the wit to frame. If he was innocent then the whole world was guilty. To acquit him was to throw over civilization and all its institutions. History has borne out the case against him; for no State has ever constituted itself on his principles or made it possible to live according to his commandments: those States who have taken his name have taken it as an alias to enable them to persecute his followers more plausibly. It is not surprising that under these circumstances, and in the absence of any defence, the Jerusalem community and the Roman government decided to exterminate Jesus. They had just as much right to do so as to exterminate the two thieves who perished with him. Preface, Leading Case of Jesus Christ

Scott Adams Fotografia

„When did ignorance become a point of view?“

—  Scott Adams cartoonist, writer 1957

Yanis Varoufakis Fotografia

„Politics, I now understand, is at its best when it enlightens us via an opponent's insight.“

—  Yanis Varoufakis Greek-Australian political economist and author, Greek finance minister 1961
Chapter 4, Trojan Horse - And The Weak Suffer What They Must?

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„It isn't always the middle-aged who refuse to listen, who will not even try to understand another point of view.“

—  Madeleine L'Engle American writer 1918 - 2007
Context: It isn't always the middle-aged who refuse to listen, who will not even try to understand another point of view. One boy would not get it through his head that for all adults God is not an old man in a white beard sitting on a cloud. As far as this boy was concerned, this old gentleman was the adult's god, and therefore he did not believe in God. Section 2.5 <!-- p. 102 -->

Paul Gallico Fotografia

„No one can be as calculatedly rude as the British, which amazes Americans, who do not understand studied insult and can only offer abuse as a substitute.“

—  Paul Gallico American writer and journalist 1897 - 1976
Quoted in The New York Times, January 14, 1962 http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9A03E4D8153DEE32A25757C1A9679C946391D6CF

Albert Einstein Fotografia

„Any fool can know. The point is to understand.“

—  Albert Einstein German-born physicist and founder of the theory of relativity 1879 - 1955

Umberto Eco Fotografia

„These systems can be studied from a syntactic, a semantic, or a pragmatic point of view.“

—  Umberto Eco Italian semiotician, essayist, philosopher, literary critic, and novelist 1932 - 2016
Context: A specific semiotics is, or aims at being, the 'grammar' of a particular sign system, and proves to be successful insofar as it describes a given field of communicative phenomena as ruled by a system of signification. Thus there are 'grammars' of the American Sign Language, of traffic signals, of a playing-card 'matrix' for different games or of a particular game (for instance, poker). These systems can be studied from a syntactic, a semantic, or a pragmatic point of view. [O] : Introduction, 0.4

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