„This is an important fighting method for one man against many.“

—  Musashi Miyamoto, Context: In battles, when the armies are in confrontation, attack the enemy's strong points and, when you see that they are beaten back, quickly separate and attack yet another strong point on the periphery of his force. The spirit of this is like a winding mountain path. This is an important fighting method for one man against many. Strike down the enemies in one quarter, or drive them back, then grasp the timing and attack further strong points to right and left, as if on a winding mountain path, weighing up the enemies' disposition. When you know the enemies' level, attack strongly with no trace of retreating spirit.
Musashi Miyamoto Fotografia
Musashi Miyamoto5
1585 - 1645
Reklama

Podobne cytaty

Miyamoto Musashi Fotografia
Ayn Rand Fotografia
Reklama
Niccolo Machiavelli Fotografia

„You must know, then, that there are two methods of fighting, the one by law, the other by force: the first method is that of men, the second of beasts; but as the first method is often insufficient, one must have recourse to the second.“

—  Niccolo Machiavelli Italian politician, Writer and Author 1469 - 1527
Context: How laudable it is for a prince to keep good faith and live with integrity, and not with astuteness, every one knows. Still the experience of our times shows those princes to have done great things who have had little regard for good faith, and have been able by astuteness to confuse men's brains, and who have ultimately overcome those who have made loyalty their foundation. You must know, then, that there are two methods of fighting, the one by law, the other by force: the first method is that of men, the second of beasts; but as the first method is often insufficient, one must have recourse to the second. It is therefore necessary to know well how to use both the beast and the man. This was covertly taught to princes by ancient writers, who relate how Achilles and many others of those princes were given to Chiron the centaur to be brought up, who kept them under his discipline; this system of having for teacher one who was half beast and half man is meant to indicate that a prince must know how to use both natures, and that the one without the other is not durable. A prince being thus obliged to know well how to act as a beast must imitate the fox and the lion, for the lion cannot protect himself from snares, and the fox cannot defend himself from wolves. One must therefore be a fox to recognise snares, and a lion to frighten wolves. Those that wish to be only lions do not understand this. Therefore, a prudent ruler ought not to keep faith when by so doing it would be against his interest, and when the reasons which made him bind himself no longer exist. If men were all good, this precept would not be a good one; but as they are bad, and would not observe their faith with you, so you are not bound to keep faith with them.... those that have been best able to imitate the fox have succeeded best. But it is necessary to be able to disguise this character well, and to be a great feigner and dissembler. Ch. 18 Variant translations of portions of this passage: Every one admits how praiseworthy it is in a prince to keep faith, and to live with integrity and not with craft. Nevertheless our experience has been that those princes who have done great things have held good faith of little account, and have known how to circumvent the intellect of men by craft, and in the end have overcome those who have relied on their word. Ch. 18. Concerning the Way in which Princes should keep Faith (as translated by W. K. Marriott) A prince being thus obliged to know well how to act as a beast must imitate the fox and the lion, for the lion cannot protect himself from traps, and the fox cannot defend himself from wolves. One must therefore be a fox to recognize traps, and a lion to frighten wolves. You must know there are two ways of contesting, the one by the law, the other by force; the first method is proper to men, the second to beasts; but because the first is frequently not sufficient, it is necessary to have recourse to the second.

 Antisthenes Fotografia
F. Scott Fitzgerald Fotografia
George Orwell Fotografia
Horatio Nelson Fotografia
Massimo Vignelli Fotografia
Reklama
 Heraclitus Fotografia

„It is harder to fight against pleasure than against anger.“

—  Heraclitus pre-Socratic Greek philosopher -535 - -475 p. n. e.
As quoted by Aristotle in Nicomachean Ethics, Book II (1105a)

Ernesto Che Guevara Fotografia

„I am not interested in dry economic socialism. We are fighting against misery, but we are also fighting against alienation.“

—  Ernesto Che Guevara Argentine Marxist revolutionary 1928 - 1967
Context: I am not interested in dry economic socialism. We are fighting against misery, but we are also fighting against alienation. One of the fundamental objectives of Marxism is to remove interest, the factor of individual interest, and gain, from people's psychological motivations. Marx was preoccupied both with economic factors and with their repercussions on the spirit. If communism isn't interested in this too, it may be a method of distributing goods, but it will never be a revolutionary way of life. As quoted in The Many Faces of Socialism Comparative Sociology and Politics (1983) by Paul Hollander, p. 224,

Erik Naggum Fotografia
Reklama
Bertolt Brecht Fotografia

„Those who are weak don't fight.
Those who are stronger might fight
for an hour.
Those who are stronger still might fight
for many years.
The strongest fight
their whole life.
They are the indispensable ones.“

—  Bertolt Brecht German poet, playwright, theatre director 1898 - 1956
"In Praise of the Fighters" (song) Variant translation: There are men who struggle for a day and they are good. There are men who struggle for a year and they are better. There are men who struggle many years, and they are better still. But there are those who struggle all their lives: These are the indispensable ones. As quoted in Democracy Unbound : Progressive Challenges to the Two Party System (1997) by David Reynolds; also quoted by Cuban musician and poet Silvio Rodríguez before his song "Sueño con serpientes". Also quoted by Eduardo Galeano (Uruguayan writer) to describe Nestor Kirchner as he received the notice of his death.

Dante Alighieri Fotografia

„Against a better will the will fights ill,...“

—  Dante Alighieri Italian poet 1265 - 1321
Canto XX, line 1 (tr. C. E. Norton).

Chuck Palahniuk Fotografia
E.M. Forster Fotografia