„Tradition reigns, the gospel of the blind adoration of what was and what is — God without a head.“

—  Henri Barbusse, Context: Tradition reigns, the gospel of the blind adoration of what was and what is — God without a head. Man's destiny is eternally blockaded by two forms of tradition; in time, by hereditary succession; in space, by frontiers, and thus it is crushed and annihilated in detail. It is the truth. I am certain of it, for I am touching it.
Henri Barbusse Fotografia
Henri Barbusse1
francuski pisarz, dziennikarz i komunista 1873 - 1935
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Aurelius Augustinus Fotografia

„If you believe what you like in the gospels, and reject what you don't like, it is not the gospel you believe, but yourself.“

—  Aurelius Augustinus early Christian theologian and philosopher 354 - 430
Earliest attribution found in Who Said That?: More than 2,500 Usable Quotes and Illustrations https://books.google.nl/books?id=7mn8AwAAQBAJ&pg=PT63 (1995) by George Sweeting. Online sources always attribute the quote to Augustine, but never specify in which of his works it is to be found.

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Khalil Gibran Fotografia
Thomas Warton Fotografia

„O! what's a table richly spread
Without a woman at its head!“

—  Thomas Warton English literary historian, critic, poet 1728 - 1790
"The Progress of Discontent" (1750), line 39.

Martin Luther Fotografia

„Is Christ only to be adored? Or is the holy Mother of God rather not to be honoured? This is the woman who crushed the Serpent's head. Hear us. For your Son denies you nothing.“

—  Martin Luther seminal figure in Protestant Reformation 1483 - 1546
Martin Luther, Weimar edition of Martin Luther's Works, English translation edited by J. Pelikan [Concordia: St. Louis], Volume 51, 128-129.

Stephen Colbert Fotografia
John Ogilby Fotografia

„First the Gods adore.“

—  John Ogilby Scottish academic 1600 - 1676

Rita Rudner Fotografia
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Ivan Illich Fotografia

„Jesus was an anarchist savior. That's what the Gospels tell us.“

—  Ivan Illich austrian philosopher and theologist 1926 - 2002
Context: Jesus was an anarchist savior. That's what the Gospels tell us. Just before He started out on His public life, Jesus went to the desert. He fasted, and after 40 days he was hungry. At this point the diabolos, appeared to tempt Him. First he asked Him to turn stone into bread, then to prove himself in a magic flight, and finally the devil, diabolos, "divider," offered Him power. Listen carefully to the words of this last of the three temptations: (Luke 4,6:) "I give you all power and glory, because I have received them and I give them to those whom I choose. Adore me and the power will be yours." It is astonishing what the devil says: I have all power, it has been given to me, and I am the one to hand it on — submit, and it is yours. Jesus of course does not submit, and sends the devilcumpower to Hell. Not for a moment, however, does Jesus contradict the devil. He does not question that the devil holds all power, nor that this power has been given to him, nor that he, the devil, gives it to whom he pleases. This is a point which is easily overlooked. By his silence Jesus recognizes power that is established as "devil" and defines Himself as The Powerless. He who cannot accept this view on power cannot look at establishments through the spectacle of the Gospel. This is what clergy and churches often have difficulty doing. They are so strongly motivated by the image of church as a "helping institution" that they are constantly motivated to hold power, share in it or, at least, influence it. The Educational enterprise in the Light of the Gospel (13 November 1988) http://www.davidtinapple.com/illich/1988_Educational.html.

George MacDonald Fotografia

„What I would say is this, that the light is not blinding because God would hide, but because the truth is too glorious for our vision.“

—  George MacDonald Scottish journalist, novelist 1824 - 1905
Context: God hides nothing. His very work from the beginning is revelation, — a casting aside of veil after veil, a showing unto men of truth after truth. On and on, from fact to fact divine he advances, until at length in his Son Jesus he unveils his very face. Then begins a fresh unveiling, for the very work of the Father is the work the Son himself has to do, — to reveal. His life was the unveiling of himself, and the unveiling of the Son is still going on, and is that for the sake of which the world exists. When he is unveiled, that is, when we know the Son, we shall know the Father also. The whole of creation, its growth, its history, the gathering total of human existence, is an unveiling of the Father. He is the life, the eternal life, the Only. I see it — ah! believe me — I see it as I cannot say it. From month to month it grows upon me. The lovely home-light, the one essence of peaceful being, is God himself. He loves light and not darkness, therefore shines, therefore reveals. True, there are infinite gulfs in him, into which our small vision cannot pierce, but they are gulfs of light, and the truths there are invisible only through excess of their own clarity. There is a darkness that comes of effulgence, and the most veiling of all veils is the light. That for which the eye exists is light, but through light no human eye can pierce. — I find myself beyond my depth. I am ever beyond my depth, afloat in an infinite sea; but the depth of the sea knows me, for the ocean of my being is God. — What I would say is this, that the light is not blinding because God would hide, but because the truth is too glorious for our vision. The effulgence of himself God veiled that he might unveil it — in his Son. Inter-universal spaces, icons, eternities — what word of vastness you can find or choose — take unfathomable darkness itself, if you will, to express the infinitude of God, that original splendor existing only to the consciousness of God himself — I say he hides it not, but is revealing it ever, for ever, at all cost of labor, yea of pain to himself. His whole creation is a sacrificing of himself to the being and well-being of his little ones, that, being wrought out at last into partakers of his divine nature, that nature may be revealed in them to their divinest bliss. He brings hidden things out of the light of his own being into the light of ours. But see how different we are, — until we learn of him! See the tendency of man to conceal his treasures, to claim even truth as his own by discovery, to hide it and be proud of it, gloating over that which he thinks he has in himself, instead of groaning after the infinite of God! We would be forever heaping together possessions, dragging things into the cave of our finitude, our individual self, not perceiving that the things which pass that dreariest of doors, whatever they may have been, are thenceforth "but straws, small sticks, and dust of the floor." When a man would have a truth in thither as if it were of private interpretation, he drags in only the bag which the truth, remaining outside, has burst and left. Ch. 31 : A Conscience

Orson Scott Card Fotografia
Walter Rauschenbusch Fotografia

„In so far as men believed that the traditional ceremonial was what God wanted of them, they would be indifferent to the reformation of social ethics.“

—  Walter Rauschenbusch United States Baptist theologian 1861 - 1918
Context: In so far as men believed that the traditional ceremonial was what God wanted of them, they would be indifferent to the reformation of social ethics. If the hydraulic force of religion could be turned toward conduct, there is nothing which it could not accomplish. p. 6

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John Shelby Spong Fotografia
Cesare Lombroso Fotografia

„The ignorant man always adores what he cannot understand.“

—  Cesare Lombroso Italian criminologist 1835 - 1909
Pt. III, ch. 3.

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