„It is not good for a man to be too cognizant of his physical and spiritual mechanisms. Complete knowledge reveals limits to human possibilities, and the less a man is by nature limited in his purposes, the less he can tolerate limits.“

—  Stanisław Lem, Fiasco (1986), Ch. 3, tr. Michael Kandel (1987)
Stanisław Lem Fotografia
Stanisław Lem131
polski pisarz, futurysta 1921 - 2006
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Charles de Gaulle Fotografia

„Man, limited by his nature, is infinite in his desires.“

—  Charles de Gaulle eighteenth President of the French Republic 1890 - 1970

„The highest knowledge man can possess is that which is true in his own experience. If his experience is limited, so is his knowledge and he behaves accordingly.“

—  Barry Long Australian spiritual teacher and writer 1926 - 2003
Context: You think: you become that thought. And consciousness, or the state of pure awareness, is lost. The highest knowledge man can possess is that which is true in his own experience. If his experience is limited, so is his knowledge and he behaves accordingly.

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Arthur Schopenhauer Fotografia

„Every man takes the limits of his own field of vision for the limits of the world.“

—  Arthur Schopenhauer, Studies in Pessimism: The Essays
"Psychological Observations"

Konrad Adenauer Fotografia

„In view of the fact that God limited the intelligence of man, it seems unfair that he did not also limit his stupidity.“

—  Konrad Adenauer German statesman, Federal Chancellor of Germany, politician (CDU) 1876 - 1967
As quoted in Through Russian Eyes : President Kennedy's 1036 Days (1973) by Anatoliĭ Andreevich Gromyko, p. 128

„A man must know his limitations.“

—  David Gemmell British author of heroic fantasy 1948 - 2006
Ch. 10

Alphonse de Lamartine Fotografia

„Limited in his nature, infinite in his desires, man is a fallen god who remembers the heavens.“

—  Alphonse de Lamartine French writer, poet, and politician 1790 - 1869
Méditations Poétiques (1820), Sermon 2

David Foster Wallace Fotografia
William Kingdon Clifford Fotografia

„It is hardly in human nature that a man should quite accurately gauge the limits of his own insight; but it is the duty of those who profit by his work to consider carefully where he may have been carried beyond it.“

—  William Kingdon Clifford English mathematician and philosopher 1845 - 1879
Context: It is hardly in human nature that a man should quite accurately gauge the limits of his own insight; but it is the duty of those who profit by his work to consider carefully where he may have been carried beyond it. If we must needs embalm his possible errors along with his solid achievements, and use his authority as an excuse for believing what he cannot have known, we make of his goodness an occasion to sin.

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Nikolai Berdyaev Fotografia
Henry James Fotografia
Alfred De Vigny Fotografia

„Every man has seen the wall that limits his mind.“

—  Alfred De Vigny French poet, playwright, and novelist 1797 - 1863
Poèmes philosophiques, "La flute", line 108; (ed.) Paul Viallaneix Oeuvres complètes (1965) p. 103; translation from Jason Merchey Values of the Wise (2004) p. 200. (1843).

Lyndon B. Johnson Fotografia

„Justice means a man's hope should not be limited by the color of his skin“

—  Lyndon B. Johnson American politician, 36th president of the United States (in office from 1963 to 1969) 1908 - 1973
Context: I hope these measures will be adequate. But if the necessities of Vietnam require it, I will not hesitate to return to the Congress for additional appropriations, or additional revenues if they are needed. The second road is justice. Justice means a man's hope should not be limited by the color of his skin. I propose legislation to establish unavoidable requirements for nondiscriminatory jury selection in federal and state courts—and to give the Attorney General the power necessary to enforce those requirements. I propose legislation to strengthen authority of federal courts to try those who murder, attack, or intimidate either civil rights workers or others exercising their constitutional rights—and to increase penalties to a level equal to the nature of the crime. Legislation, resting on the fullest constitutional authority of the federal government, to prohibit racial discrimination in the sale or rental of housing. For that other nation within a nation—the poor—whose distress has now captured the conscience of America, I will ask the Congress not only to continue, but to speed up the war on poverty. And in so doing, we will provide the added energy of achievement with the increased efficiency of experience. To improve the life of our rural Americans and our farm population, we will plan for the future through the establishment of several new Community Development Districts, improved education through the use of Teacher Corps teams, better health measures, physical examinations, and adequate and available medical resources.

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Mark Twain Fotografia
Albert Einstein Fotografia

„He may also believe in the existence of the ideal limit of knowledge and that it is approached by the human mind. He may call this ideal limit the objective truth.“

—  Albert Einstein German-born physicist and founder of the theory of relativity 1879 - 1955
Context: Physical concepts are free creations of the human mind, and are not, however it may seem, uniquely determined by the external world. In our endeavor to understand reality we are somewhat like a man trying to understand the mechanism of a closed watch. He sees the face and the moving hands, even hears its ticking, but he has no way of opening the case. If he is ingenious he may form some picture of a mechanism which could be responsible for all the things he observes, but he may never be quite sure his picture is the only one which could explain his observations. He will never be able to compare his picture with the real mechanism and he cannot even imagine the possibility or the meaning of such a comparison. But he certainly believes that, as his knowledge increases, his picture of reality will become simpler and simpler and will explain a wider and wider range of his sensuous impressions. He may also believe in the existence of the ideal limit of knowledge and that it is approached by the human mind. He may call this ideal limit the objective truth. The Evolution of Physics (1938) (co-written with Leopold Infeld) <!-- later published by Simon & Schuster (1967) -->

Ludwig Feuerbach Fotografia
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