„He who covets what belongs to another deservedly loses his own.“

—  Fedrus, Book I, fable 4, line 1.
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„Who vaunts his race, lauds what belongs to others.“

—  Seneca the Younger Roman Stoic philosopher, statesman, and dramatist -4 - 65 p. n. e.
Alternate translation: He who boasts of his descent, praises the deeds of another (translator unknown). Hercules Furens (The Madness of Hercules), lines 340-341; (Lycus).

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„The forum [is] an established place for men to cheat one another, and behave covetously.“

—  Anacharsis Scythian philosopher 600
As quoted in The Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers by Diogenes Laërtius, as translated by C. D. Yonge) (1853), "Anacharsis" sect. 5, p. 48

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„Once the curtain is raised, the actor ceases to belong to himself. He belongs to his character, to his author, to his public.“

—  Sarah Bernhardt French actress 1844 - 1923
Context: Once the curtain is raised, the actor ceases to belong to himself. He belongs to his character, to his author, to his public. He must do the impossible to identify himself with the first, not to betray the second, and not to disappoint the third. And to this end the actor must forget his personality and throw aside his joys and sorrows. He must present the public with the reality of a being who for him is only a fiction. With his own eyes, he must shed the tears of the other. With his own voice, he must groan the anguish of the other. His own heart beats as if it would burst, for it is the other's heart that beats in his heart. And when he retires from a tragic or dramatic scene, if he has properly rendered his character, he must be panting and exhausted. The Art of the Theatre (1925), p. 171

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