„The world is round and the place which may seem like the end may also be only the beginning.“

Rebecca West Fotografia
Rebecca West1
1892 - 1983
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Malcolm Gladwell Fotografia
John Howard Payne Fotografia

„Mid pleasures and palaces though we may roam,
Be it ever so humble, there 's no place like home;
A charm from the skies seems to hallow us there,
Which sought through the world is ne'er met with elsewhere.“

—  John Howard Payne American actor and writer 1791 - 1852
Home, Sweet Home (1822), from the opera of "Clari, the Maid of Milan", reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919). Compare: "Home is home, though it be never so homely", John Clarke, Paræmiologia, p. 101. (1639).

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Octavio Paz Fotografia

„It may be that, like things which speak to themselves in their language of things, language does not speak of things or of the world: it may speak only of itself and to itself.“

—  Octavio Paz Mexican writer laureated with the 1990 Nobel Prize for Literature 1914 - 1998
Context: Fixity is always momentary. But how can it always be so? If it were, it would not be momentary — or would not be fixity. What did I mean by that phrase? I probably had in mind the opposition between motion and motionlessness, an opposition that the adverb always designates as continual and universal: it embraces all of time and applies to every circumstance. My phrase tends to dissolve this opposition and hence represents a sly violation of the principle of identity. I say “sly” because I chose the word momentary as an adjectival qualifier of fixity in order to tone down the violence of the contrast between movement and motionlessness. A little rhetorical trick intended to give an air of plausibility to my violation of the rules of logic. The relations between rhetoric and ethics are disturbing: the ease with which language can be twisted is worrisome, and the fact that our minds accept these perverse games so docilely is no less cause for concern. We ought to subject language to a diet of bread and water if we wish to keep it from being corrupted and from corrupting us. (The trouble is that a-diet-of-bread-and-water is a figurative expression, as is the-corruption-of-language-and-its-contagions.) It is necessary to unweave (another metaphor) even the simplest phrases in order to determine what it is that they contain (more figurative expressions) and what they are made of and how (what is language made of? and most important of all, is it already made, or is it something that is perpetually in the making?). Unweave the verbal fabric: reality will appear. (Two metaphors.) Can reality be the reverse of the fabric, the reverse of metaphor — that which is on the other side of language? (Language has no reverse, no opposite faces, no right or wrong side.) Perhaps reality too is a metaphor (of what and/or of whom?). Perhaps things are not things but words: metaphors, words for other things. With whom and of what do word-things speak? (This page is a sack of word-things.) It may be that, like things which speak to themselves in their language of things, language does not speak of things or of the world: it may speak only of itself and to itself. Ch. 4 Ch. 4 -->

John Denham Fotografia
Mitch Albom Fotografia
Stephen King Fotografia
Ronnie James Dio Fotografia
Leonardo Da Vinci Fotografia
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Mitch Albom Fotografia
Frederick Buechner Fotografia
Nigel Cumberland Fotografia

„There may also be a cost of not acting in the first place and sometimes doing nothing is not an option“

—  Nigel Cumberland British author and leadership coach 1967
Context: It is not just a question of needing courage to do something. There may also be a cost of not acting in the first place and sometimes doing nothing is not an option, with the challenge being to minimize the potential risks of any choice you do make. page 210

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Libba Bray Fotografia
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